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If you’re planning to travel to Rwanda, below are the Rwanda latest Covid-19 entry requirements summary:

Covid-19 negative test:

Arriving passengers must present a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to the first departure.

Health declaration:

All travelers must complete a Passenger Locator Form online. On completion, travelers will be given a Unique Health Code (UHC) which they must present on arrival.

Test on arrival:

All arrivers will be tested for Covid-19, then taken to a designated hotel for 24 hours, awaiting results (USD 60 per test).

Note:

Tourists are required to take a PCR test 72 hours prior to visiting a national park (except for Akagera). Tourists visiting Akagera are required to take a rapid antigen test, available at numerous walk-in clinics in Kigali (RWF 10,000). No tourist will be admitted to any national park without a valid negative test result.

The Rwandan government is taking the safety and health of our travelers seriously, and has implemented regulations that will help make it possible for everyone to enjoy a safe safari, as well as protect the endangered primates. Rwanda has been lucky enough to be a safe destination to visit and these new measures will ensure it will continue to be so
Click here For Full Rwandan travel advisoryDownload
If you want to plan a safe and responsible trip to Rwanda, Feel free to contact us so that we can start planning unforgettable moments for you and your loved ones.

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COVID Test requirements for arriving passengers

  1. Passengers must have a negative PCR based Covid-19 certificate carried out within 96 hours prior to departure date.
  2. The mandatory Ministry of Health Travelers Health Surveillance Online Form must be filled out and submitted prior to travel. The online form should be accessed from the Ministry of Health website: https://ears.health.go.ke/airline_registration/.
  3. After submitting the travel surveillance form, Passengers are advised to download the QR code. Passengers will be required to display the received QR codes to port health officials on arrival for them to be allowed to proceed to arrival immigration.
  4. Arriving passengers will be required to undergo a 14-day quarantine except if you are coming from the exempted countries.
  5. Locator forms to be completed and left with the operator for the purposes of traceability.

Kenya and the entire East African region are open for travel with strict adherence to the WHO and the ministries of health COVID-19 protocols. 

All air passengers entering the Republic of Kenya are required to present a negative COVID-19 test, taken within 96 hours of departure or proof of recovery from the virus within the last 90 days.

Airlines must confirm the negative test result or proof of recovery for all passengers twelve years of age and over prior to boarding. Airlines must deny boarding of passengers who do not provide documentation of a negative test or recovery.

The Ministry of Health recommends that you do not travel internationally until you are fully vaccinated. International travel poses additional risks, and even fully vaccinated travelers might be at increased risk for getting and possibly spreading some COVID-19 variants. Delay travel and stay home to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

At Alligator Adventures Tours and Safaris, the safety of our clients and staff comes first and we’re taking all necessary measures to ensure that we do not aid the spread of the virus.

All our staff members have been fully vaccinated and we encourage all our clients to be fully vaccinated before travelling. We provide free masks, hand sanitizers, take the temperature checks of all our clients on a daily basis during safari.

We also limit the number of people who can sit in a single vehicle at a time to embrace the law of physical distancing. We’ve reduced the number of staff members working from our offices and encourage them to work from home.

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At Erideka Safaris Kenya, we are a holiday safari tour operator who genuinely takes great pride in providing safari tours and local excursions covering Kenya, Tanzania, and other safari hotspots throughout Africa. Our most popular safari options are the famous Nairobi to Nairobi safaris with Maasai Mara game reserve destination, particularly at the time of the Great Migration in late July to mid-August, when thousands of wildebeest and other plains animals migrate across Kenya & Tanzania East in Africa in search of food and water. Although the Great Migration is renowned as the great migration of zebra and wildebeest, you’ll see many different types of animals on your wildlife safari trip. Here we list some of the Animals to look out for while on Kenyan Safari.

Popular BIG 5 animals on Kenyan Safari Adventure

A Kenya Wildlife safari is not just about the Big Five, as well as looking out for the big 5 game animals, you’ll see a variety of other animals on a Kenya Safari Trip at the time of the Great Wildebeest Migration:

Elephants

It would be hard to miss an elephant whilst you are on safari. Found only in Africa, there are two species of African elephant to look out for on your adventure: The bush elephant and the forest elephant.

Lions

The African Lion describes many species of lion found in Africa. Lions are the second largest cat, after the tiger and are one of the big five game animals people look out for on safari. On a Nairobi and Mombasa Kenya Erideka Safaris Kenya Safari, you can expect to see lions lounging on the marshes at the time of the Great Migration. Take your pick from our selection of Nairobi safari tours.

Buffalo

The Buffalo is a member of the Big five animals. It is wild and aggressive in nature and live in a herd.  They are known to kill lions when in a group specially to protect one of their own when attacked by the lions as a meal.
It can be found in Amboseli National Park, Tsavo East National Park, Nakuru National Park, Nairobi National Park, Hells Gate National Park and Maasai Mara game reserve.

Rhino

It is among the endangered species of wild animals in Kenya for illegal trade in horns. There are two types of Rhinos in Kenya, The Black Rhino and White Rhino.
A female Rhino can give birth once every 5 years and that is the reason their population is low. Most of the Rhinos in Kenya are protected in sanctuaries and national parks.

Leopard

Leopards are graceful and powerful big cats closely related to lions, tigers, and pumas. They live in sub-Saharan Africa, upper east Africa, Central Asia, India, and China. Be that as it may, huge numbers of their populaces are imperiled, particularly outside of Africa.
Find the perfect tour for your family in time for 2021 – 2022 adventure, check out the full range of Kenya safari holidays.

Check out more of the wildlife you can expect to see in Kenya including: –

Crocodiles

Migrating animals must cross the Maasai Mara river in order to reach the nutritious land. On the crossing, you can expect to see crocodiles snapping up the zebras and wildebeest as they attempt to move forward on their migration. Crocodiles are large aquatic reptiles that live in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia.

Plains Zebras

Zebras are social animals that live in groups, whether this is a small harem (consisting of one or two dominant males, a small number of females and their offspring) or large herd. Their stripes come in different patterns that are unique to each individual. There are actually three species of zebras. These are: The Plains zebra, the Gravy’s zebra and the mountain zebra. Plains zebras live in south and east Africa, although the species is in decline, they are usually found on treeless grassland and savanna woodland. One of the best areas for viewing grassland plains wildlife, have you considered a Maasai Mara safari holiday?

Wildebeest

The black wildebeest and the blue wildebeest are native to Africa. It is mainly the blue wildebeest that migrate during the Great Migration.
Wildebeest often graze in herds with Zebra, for heightened awareness of prowling predators.

See the Great Wildebeest Migration with Erideka Safaris

To book your dream Kenyan safari, contact us at Erideka Safaris Kenya. A member of our safari team shall get back to you within 12 hours to help you book your once in a lifetime trip
Choose Erideka Safaris Kenya to experience the best African safari holidays.

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Erideka Safaris Kenya offers migration-oriented tours to both Tanzania and Kenya. While wildlife sightings can never be guaranteed, both locals have generally offered thundering masses of wildebeest, zebras racing across the savannah, and the drama that unfolds when predator encounters prey. We help you to decide Which country to choose for a Trip between Kenya and Tanzania?

During migration season in Tanzania, the massive herds tend to position themselves in the southern plains, where the grasses are tastier, more nutritious, and plentiful. Because these grasses are short, the animals can be easier to see.

Wildebeest babies are born from January through March. So, a visit to Tanzania in February may result in seeing many newborns. But they’re also easier prey for hungry predators, making the scene more dramatic. For some, that can be heart-wrenching to watch.

In Kenya, meanwhile, the draw is the Mara River. While the river flows through both Tanzania and Kenya, the wildebeest tend to cross it in Kenya in the summertime, to escape the dusty plains in search of grasses.

Watching them cross is a breathtaking spectacle – the hesitancy to enter the water, unsure of whether crocodiles or hippos are waiting under the surface, unable to judge how deep the water is. But once a few bold zebras head across, hundreds of zebras and wildebeest will join, oftentimes following one another in a line with a torrent of splashes, barks, and calls.

While chances to see the migration across the land are strong, getting to see wildebeest cross the river en masse all depends on timing.

In both countries, there is no shortage of The Big Five—lions, elephants, cape buffalo, leopards, and black rhinos—and dozens of other species. Travelers will get more than their fill of scintillating wildlife sightings on safaris in either country.

Tanzania has the extra distinction of being home to Ngorongoro Crater. More than 25,000 individual animals—lions, zebras, wildebeest, black rhinos, hippos, gazelles, the list goes on and on—reside in the volcanic caldera. One expert described it as “going to an aquarium with wildlife that is virtually captive.” But it also inevitably draws large crowds.

There’s a reason that East Africa draws hundreds of thousands of visitors a year. That doesn’t mean you necessarily want to see all of those other tourists while you’re on safari, though.

Both our Tanzania and Kenya tours get you as off the beaten path as an East African safari will allow, while positioning you in ideal spots to see the migration. We stay at private concessions such as that can accommodate small groups of travelers and use mobile or semi-permanent camps.

Most of the Bush Camps we use in Mara Kenya are either inside the Pack or on private land that strictly limits the number of people on the property.

An example of this private is Kicheche. Its Accommodates just 12 guests, and the region is reserved for your group only. By staying at private concessions such as Kicheche and also the Arumeru Lodge in Arusha, Tanzania, you have the opportunity to do walking safaris something not normally allowed in the Serengeti or Maasai Mara national parks.

On both trips, you’ll also stay at mobile or semi-permanent camps that are positioned in prime wildlife-viewing spots. Each tour allows you to stay at two different camps. In Tanzania, for example, our mobile tented camp will likely be situated to allow a view of the migration spectacle as well as proximity to the Gol kopjes, an outcropping of granite boulders that’s preferred habitat for cheetahs and gazelles.

Whether you chose Tanzania, Kenya, or both, you can travel with Erideka Safaris Kenya.

Erideka Safaris Kenya offers migration-oriented tours to both Tanzania and Kenya. While wildlife sightings can never be guaranteed, both locales have generally offered thundering masses of wildebeest, zebras racing across the savannah and the drama that unfolds when predator encounters prey.

But which to choose?

During migration season in Tanzania, the massive herds tend to position themselves in the southern plains, where the grasses are tastier, more nutritious and plentiful. Because these grasses are short, the animals can be easier to see.

Wildebeest babies are born in January through March. So, a visit to Tanzania in February may result in seeing many newborns. But they’re also easier prey for hungry predators, making the scene more dramatic. For some, that can be heart wrenching to watch.

In Kenya, meanwhile, the draw is the Mara River. While the river flows through both Tanzania and Kenya, the wildebeest tend to cross it in Kenya in the summertime, to escape the dusty plains in search of grasses.

Watching them cross is a breathtaking spectacle – the hesitancy to enter the water, unsure of whether crocodiles or hippos are waiting under the surface, unable to judge how deep the water is. But once a few bold zebras head across, hundreds of zebras and wildebeest will join, oftentimes following one another in a line with a torrent of splashes, barks and calls.

While chances to see the migration across land are strong, getting to see wildebeest cross the river en masse all depends on timing.

In both countries, there is no shortage of The Big Five; -lions, elephants, cape buffalo, leopards and black rhinos and dozens of other species. Travelers will get more than their fill of scintillating wildlife sightings on safaris in either country.

Tanzania has the extra distinction of being home to Ngorongoro Crater. More than 25,000 individual animals lions, zebras, wildebeest, black rhinos, hippos, gazelles, the list goes on and on reside in the volcanic caldera. One expert described it like “going to an aquarium with wildlife that is virtually captive.” But it also inevitably draws large crowds.

There’s a reason that East Africa draws hundreds of thousands of visitors a year. That doesn’t mean you necessarily want to see all of those other tourists while you’re on safari, though.

Both our Tanzania and Kenya tours get you as off-the-beaten-path as an East African safari will allow, while positioning you in ideal spots to see the migration. We stay at private concessions such as that can accommodate small groups of travelers and use mobile or semi-permanent camps.

The Kicheche Bush Camp we use just outside Mara North in Kenya is on private land that strictly limits the number of people on the property.

Accommodating just 12 guests, the region is reserved for your group only. By staying at private concessions such as Kicheche and also the Arumeru Lodge in Arusha, Tanzania, you have the opportunity to do walking safaris something not normally allowed in the Serengeti or Maasai Mara national parks.

On both trips, you’ll also stay at mobile or semi-permanent camps that are positioned in prime wildlife-viewing spots. Each tour allows you to stay at two different such camps. In Tanzania, for example, our mobile tented camp will likely be situated to allow a view of the migration spectacle as well as proximity to the Gol kopjes, an outcropping of granite boulders that’s preferred habitat for cheetahs and gazelles.

Whether you chose Tanzania, Kenya, or both, you can travel with Erideka Safaris Kenya.

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There is a lot of really bad conservation news coming out of Africa these days. Most notably, surging demand for illegal wildlife products in Asian markets has created a devastating rhino and elephant poaching crisis across the continent. In South Africa, which is home to around 93% and 40% of the world’s white and black rhino populations respectively, over 1,000 rhinos were killed for their horns in both 2014 and 2013. Experts warn that rhinos could become extinct in the wild by the end of the decade if the crisis continues unabated. Elephants haven’t had it much better. In Tanzania’s Selous Game Reserve. Which is one of the last great strongholds of the African elephant, for example, 25,000 individuals (about 66% of the reserve’s total population) were killed between 2009 and 2013. Though there is some Good News for African Wildlife from Serengeti – Maasai Mara Elephants Census.

So, what should we make of the recent news that elephant numbers increased by 266% in the Serengeti-Maasai Mara ecosystem between 1986 and 2014? The news is based on the results of an aerial census conducted last year by the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, in conjunction with the Frankfurt Zoological Society, and the Kenya Wildlife Service. In 1986, census takers estimated that 2,058 elephants were living in the Serengeti-Maasai Mara ecosystem, which encompasses nearly 20,000 square miles in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. In 2014, researchers counted 7,450 elephants in the same area, which is surprising, to say the least, in light of the poaching crisis.

Overall, there seems to be little doubt that elephant numbers have declined across Kenya and Tanzania since the poaching epidemic began in earnest in 2007. Perhaps elephants are simply migrating from areas where they are more vulnerable to areas where they enjoy greater protection. The census also found that elephants seem to be migrating out of Kenya’s Maasai Mara and into Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. William Mwakilema, Chief Warden of Serengeti National Park, seems to favor this idea. He recently said, “We have a very conducive environment in Tanzania, where the wildlife species feel safe and that is why they are all rushing into the Serengeti.”

The aerial survey is set to move to Tanzania’s Tarangire-Lake Manyara ecosystem next, which should give conservationists and wildlife managers a better sense of what’s happening with the country’s elephant populations. But for now, at least, this increase in elephant numbers seems to be a small bright spot in an otherwise bleak situation and one more reason to visit the Serengeti.

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